CANADALAND

Adam Gopnik lived out a certain Canadian fantasy. He left the country and became a prominent New York intellectual. He writes about the move in his new book, At the Stranger's Gate.

Gopnik is now a staff writer at the New Yorker, where he writes about Canada — like in this profile of Michael Ignatieff or the recent piece, "We Could Have Been Canada."

He talks about how New York has changed, whether it still has anything to offer to dreamy exiles, and the bright side of Canada being run by a small pool of political elites. Jesse tries to keep up.

Direct download: CANADALAND_205_Out_Of_My_Depth_With_Adam_Gopnik.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:06am EST

Quebec passes a racist law.

A bunch of media outlets ran a story that used video manipulation and questionable translation to make it look like an imam was calling for the slaughter of Jews. After he lost his job, his reputation was ruined and there were hateful protests at his mosque, Toronto Star --who ran the original story-- exposed the dangerous flaws of the early reporting.

Student leader Masuma Khan faced censure from Dalhousie University for a vulgar, anti-Canada 150 Facebook post and some of the usual free speech purists are conspicuously silent.

And we address listener questions about a weird story in Fast Company about Casper and the online mattress industry.

Massey journalism fellow Naheed Mustafa co-hosts.

Naheed's Twitter: @NaheedMustafa

Direct download: _SHORTCUTS_139_Distorted_Sermon_Coercive_Mattress.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:04pm EST

The Toronto Star's Daniel Dale has become one of the most-watched journalists in Washington in part by simply enumerating Donald Trump's lies (Dale counted 720 as of last week). He got his start covering pomp and fatuousness by being the Star's reporter in charge of following the Rob Ford administration.

This episode was recorded live at the Hot Docs Podcast Festival in Toronto on October 15, 2017. 

Support us at patreon.com/CANADALAND and see this year's goals and rewards. 

Direct download: CANADALAND_204_-_Daniel_Dale.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 12:42am EST

The Conservative Party leader walked away from a scrum when pressed about his campaign manager working in far right media company The Rebel's office during his campaign. 

 

We look at the language around Gord Downie's death.

 

And there are a lot of unanswered questions in the story of freed hostage Joshua Boyle.

 

Freelancer and former VICE reporter Justin Ling co-hosts.

Justin's Twitter: @justin_ling


Sarah Polley talks about how she helped Jesse break a major story. 

And she discusses domestic abuse, sexual harassment and assault, and the culture that fuels it. 

Support us at patreon.com/CANADALAND and see this year's goals and rewards. 

Direct download: Ep.203_-_My_Awkward_Date_With_Sarah_Polley_V3.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 9:00pm EST

An "unprecedented national collaboration" between The National Observer, Global, The Toronto Star and more exposes the dangers of sour gas in Saskatchewan. But as OurSask.ca points out, they forgot to mention the CBC broke the story two years ago. 

 

The Globe and Mail pillories the Liberals' tax plan.

 

CBC journalists find creative ways to criticize the CBC.

 

The National Post's Jen Gerson co-hosts.

 

Jen's Twitter: @jengerson

Direct download: SHORTCUTS_137_Sour_Gas_Racist_Soap.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:29pm EST

The way we make culture in Canada is finished. The CanCon system was built around radio frequency and cable subscriptions. That's done. 

Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly had the thankless task of crafting a new culture plan that was sure to disappoint. She is now being viciously attacked by the press, the same press that did not get their requested newspaper bailout. 

In the plan, Joly announced a boost (as yet unspecified) to the Canadian Media Fund, funding for a cultural export strategy and a digital news incubator envisioned as a joint venture between Ryerson University and Facebook.

But all anybody seemingly wants to talk about is the deal in which Netflix has pledged $500-million over five years toward original Canadian content - and why that's somehow a terrible thing.

Joining Jesse is University of Ottawa professor and digital technology expert Michael Geist to unpack the deal.

Also on this episode Ira Wells, contributor to The Walrus, discusses how Canada's revamped cultural policy aims low and ignores art.


Co-host Omar Mouallem lives in the Edmonton neighbourhood where the terror attack took place over the weekend. He discusses what he saw in the news versus what he saw in real life.

On Jagmeet Singh's first interview with CBC's Power and Politics as the NDP's leader, Terry Milewski takes the opportunity to grill him about the Air India bomber.

The takes are in for the Government's #DigiCanCon plan, AKA The Netflix Deal, to revamp the Canadian content industry.

 

Omar's Twitter: @omar_aok

Direct download: SHORTCUTS_136_Will_You_Denounce_Terry_Milewskis_Moustache.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:49am EST

When we found out the Trudeau Government was selling armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia, despite their terrible human rights record, there was little public debate. When a professor launched a bid to stop the deal, the Federal Court rejected it, saying there was no proof that the vehicles were being used against Saudi citizens. 

 

Then this summer, videos surfaced that appeared to show that Ontario-made combat vehicles were in fact being deployed against Saudi civilians. That news barely made a splash.

 

The Globe and Mail's Steven Chase has been following this story closely - and is one of few reporters who have been covering it at all. You can read all of his reporting at the Globe and Mail.


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