CANADALAND

Is all of your Facebook data up for sale? What do the Cambridge Analytica revelations mean for Canada? When does journalism cross the line into criminal harassment? And if there hasn't been any major violence in 20 years, why are we all of a sudden freaking out about Khalistan so much?

Direct download: 159.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00pm EST

In an age of sensationalized true crime podcasts and Netflix docudramas—and with no end in sight—can longform crime reporting reach beyond morbid fascination?

For those journalists who cover crime, what are their responsibilities as reporters interviewing the accused? How do they know if they’re being used by calculated manipulators, and if they are, should they still report it?

To get answers, guest host Omar Mouallem speaks with Globe and Mail reporter, Jana Pruden.

You can read Jana’s story, Fear On The Family Farm here.

Direct download: Ep._223_-_The_Misery_Beat.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 2:28am EST

Another populist businessman turned politician defeats a more-qualified female candidate. Will the Competition Bureau actually do anything other than raid some offices? And does the CBC hate Sikhs? Kieran Delamont co-hosts.

Direct download: Short_Cuts_158.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:58pm EST

Patrick Brown announced last month that he would be suing CTV, after they published a report of his alleged sexual misconduct — but whether or not Brown actually goes through with the lawsuit is yet to be seen.

Being threatened with a defamation lawsuit is arguably a rite of passage for journalists. The fear of libel hangs over every newsroom, so this is a risky business — but maybe it's not as risky as we like to act like it is.

Media litigation lawyers Justin Safayeni and Adam Wygodny speak with Jesse about how often people sue for libel, the precedence of the 2009 Grant vs. Torstar ruling, and how 'anti-SLAPP' laws in Ontario are helping to protect journalists.

Direct download: Ep._222_-_How_To_Slander_Friends_And_Libel_People.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 3:21am EST

Has Tom Power gotten an easy ride? Facebook finds a new way to manipulate the news. And with so many awful people on Twitter, how are they choosing who to ban?

 

Sarah Hagi co-hosts.

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_157_The_Haunted_Dungeon_Of_Q.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00pm EST

After two years of reports and stuffy consultations, the slow-moving train-wreck that's been the "news bailout" has made its way into the proposed 2018-19 federal budget.

The budget dedicates $50 million dollars over five years to "supporting local journalism," but who's eligible for funding? Though crucial details are pending, PostMedia Network's CEO Paul Godfrey and former Globe and Mail EIC Ed Greenspon are not happy—so maybe this isn't such a bad thing after all!

Jesse speaks with entrepreneurs running innovative, independent digital media startups across the country to gauge their reactions, and to see if any of them will be vying for a piece of the government-made pie.

Maureen Googoo of Ku'Ku'Kwes News (Atlantic Canada), Tim Bousquet of The Halifax Examiner (Halifax), Erin Millar of Discourse Media (Vancouver), Jeremy Klaszus of The Sprawl (Calgary), and James Baxter of iPolitics (Ottawa) join Jesse.


Why did CBC News let Justin Trudeau use them like a cheap tool? Why did Patrick Brown quit (this time)? And what's up with the newspaper bailout plan? Stephen Maher co-hosts. 

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_Ep.156_-_Rogue_Indian_Elements.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 11:57pm EST

After years of dodging emails about the internal politics of the country's largest subreddit, r/Canada, Jesse finally jumps down the weirdo-message-board rabbit hole.

Nearly 340k people are subscribed to r/Canada, with many using it as a primary source of national news. This past week, private messages were leaked between two of the subreddit's moderators, in which one moderator named u/Perma wrote that they were "slowly becoming" a white nationalist.

Freelance journalist and CANADALAND contributor, Evan Balgord joins Jesse to get a sense of how one of Canada's biggest informal, "non-partisan" news platforms begun skewing (alt)right and how Reddit influences mainstream media (and politics).

Jesse also speaks to the person responsible for leaking the conversation, "Neil" AKA u/UsedToDonateBlood, the founding moderator of r/OnGuardForThee — the breakout subreddit pushing back against the "censorious," and increasingly "alt-right" editorial slant of r/Canada.


An earlier version of this episode made reference to a Justin Trudeau AMA on r/CanadaPolitics. This was in fact an April Fool's hoax.

Direct download: CANADALAND_220_We_Need_To_Talk_About_Reddit_updated.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 6:10am EST

Did CTV actually f**k up its Patrick Brown exposé? Can we reverse engineer his crisis communications PR strategy? When can we talk about anything else?

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_Ep.155_-_Patrick_Brown_Totally_Has_Sisters.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 12:06am EST

On February 9, Gerald Stanley — the farmer accused of killing 22-year-old Cree man, Colten Boushie, in Battleford, Saskatchewan — was acquitted of second-degree murder.

In the wake of the verdict, Jesse revisits a conversation he had in Saskatoon with Betty Ann Adam (Saskatoon StarPhoenix), Rob Innes (Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan), and Mylan Tootoosis (PhD candidate, University of Saskatchewan).

This show was recorded live at Winterruption in Cosmo Seniors Centre on January 20th, 2017. The original airing of this episode was produced by Katie Jensen.