CANADALAND

After the release of the Public Policy Forum's Shattered Media report this past winter comes the latest beg for cash to prop up the newspaper industry. This one comes in the form of a request for a subsidy totaling hundred of millions of dollars per year from News Media Canada, the umbrella advocacy organization for Canadian newspapers.

While it claims to advocate for the maintenance of local journalism, the organization shies away from supporting small, digital startups, which are often the strongest source of civic journalism in many Canadian communities.

The Trudeau government swiftly knocked down the idea of taxing Netflix and other digital endeavours to fund this bailout, though it sounds like they're ultimately in favour of finding that funding.

Bob Cox, Chair of the Board of News Media Canada as well as the publisher of the Winnipeg Free Press joins us.

 

(Producers' note: owing to a technical glitch with our telephone recording process, this interview is an amalgam of two separate interviews conducted with Bob Cox on one day.)

Direct download: CANADALAND_-_189_The_Great_Newspaper_Bailout.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 6:24am EDT

Governor General David Johnston issued a mea culpa over his radio interview in which he refers to Indigenous peoples as immigrants.

Postmedia did not issue mea culpas for poorly-researched racist screeds in its Vancouver and Toronto outlets. Instead, they continue to rattle the cup in front of the federal government for bailout money.

Finally, the National Post issued a mea culpa for years of Conrad Black columns by announcing they would stop publishing their Monday edition of the paper.

 

(Producers' note: Jesse Brown would like to issue a mea culpa after misstating the name of one of the lead characters of TV sitcom Three's Company, while Short Cuts guest David Berry's mea culpa comes over misstating that 'Sufferin' Succotash' was a catchphrase of Foghorn Leghorn. It was, in fact, Sylvester the Cat.)

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_124_-_Quote_Governor_General_Unquote.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 1:52am EDT

Iraqi photojournalist Ali Arkady thought he was documenting the "good guys" -- the non-sectarian forces fighting Daesh for the preservation of Iraq. Instead, Arkady witnessed abuse, torture, and murder committed by the Emergency Response Division.

 After fleeing Iraq with his family, Arkady partnered with the Toronto Star and ABC News to have his work see the light. He joins Jesse Brown on the phone from an undisclosed location in Europe alongside Mitch Potter, one of the three Star reporters who helped write this essential exposé.

Direct download: CANADALAND_188_-_The_Images_Are_Merciless.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 5:55am EDT

Breitbart News has convinced concerned Christian families that Ontario’s new child protection laws will bring forth a queer totalitarian state, where parents opposing or denying their children’s gender identity will have them forcibly removed from their homes.

After tweeting about almost being published in Teen Vogue on June 2, Toronto-based freelance writer, Roslyn Talusan’s call-out of the magazine went viral and led to dozens of writers flooding her inbox with similar stories of being strung along after having successfully pitched personal stories and essays approved by editors of Conde Nast’s supposedly progressive, feminist magazine.

The Liberal government is moving forward with an amendment to the Criminal Code,  as a result of the Jian Ghomeshi case. The change will, for the first time, ensure that a complainant’s text messages, e-mails and video recordings with sexual content or a sexual purpose can be kept out of trials.

Freelance writer and editor at Femsplain, Roslyn Talusan joins Jesse.

Direct download: _17.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 7:48am EDT

Or did we play ourselves?

This most recent Conservative leadership race highlighted a number of deficiencies in Canadian media. Namely, why did the guy with virtually no chance of ever becoming Prime Minister, who skipped debates and ran much of his campaign from Boston, receive so much more press coverage than the guy who actually won the leadership? Did media just go for the low-hanging fruit, or did we allow ourselves to be manipulated by an expert huckster?

CBC.ca's Opinion Producer Robyn Urback has some opinions of her own and joins us for the episode.

Direct download: CANADALAND_187_-_We_Got_Played.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 5:31am EDT

Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland stands up to the sole remaining global superpower like a newborn kitten taking on Galactus.

Somewhere between 10 and 5,000 freedom-loving citizens descend on Parliament Hill to rail against Trudeau, refugees, Islam, you name it. Of course, close to 10,000 attended the most recent pro-marijuana rally, proving that Canadians love pot far more than they fear Sharia law.

Finally, Scott Gilmore pens a tone-deaf piece for Macleans highlighting conditions on First Nations reservations and the solution is for the rest of us to ... care?

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_122_-_Imagine_If_Your_Daughter_Was_Eaten_By_Otters.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 12:20am EDT

McClelland & Stewart was the publishing house that, at one time, served as the home for the likes of Margaret Atwood, Michael Ondaatje, Leonard Cohen and others. In 2000, under the direction of building magnate Avie Bennett, it was broken apart and sold to the University of Toronto and to Random House Canada. It's now entirely owned by a foreign company.

Elaine Dewar, author of the new book The Handover, joins us to explain the seeming sleight-of-hand that put this institution in foreign hands.

Avie Bennett died this past weekend at the age of 89.

Direct download: CANADALAND_186_-_End_Of_The_CanLit_Hustle.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 4:34am EDT

The Conservatives have a new, dimpled, leader, Nova Scotians have more of the same, and British Columbians have an unprecedented lefty hybrid. How effective was media coverage of these three electoral events?

Plus, Toronto Life's recent tone-deaf spurt of house porn has led to, if not riots in the streets, then at least a whole lot of snark on social media.

Journalist Katie Toth joins us.

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_121_-_Parkdale_Class_War.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 5:17am EDT

One cardinal rule of journalism is that reporters never accept incentives, be that meals, gifts, or - God forbid - money, from the subjects on whom they're reporting. This applies across the board except, we now know, in the travel section.

Travel writers used to diligently follow this standard but, as newspapers and magazines were increasingly unable or unwilling to foot expenses, these journalists were forced to find alternative sources to fund their trips. This meant cozying up to hotel chains, airlines, and tourism bureaus.

If travel writers are being subsidized by the tourism industry, can the readers trust the stories? Bert Archer is arguably Canada's most prolific travel writer and teaches the practice and ethics of travel writing at the University of Toronto. He believes journalists can maintain their editorial independence - but must walk a careful line.

Direct download: CANADALAND_185_-_Travel_Journalisms_Dirty_Little_Secret.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 3:30am EDT

This week, The Guardian continued its exemplary coverage of Canadian university student unions.

Hamilton police arrest two journalists attempting to cover a traffic fatality.

And the Toronto Star wants you to trust it.

This week's Short Cuts comes to you from scenic Hamilton and the studios of CFMU. The Public Record's Joey Coleman joins Jesse and suggests new ways to report on traffic deaths, and how local newspapers need to up their game when it comes to investigative reporting.

Direct download: SHORT_CUTS_120_Joey_Coleman.mp3
Category:media/news -- posted at: 1:29am EDT